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Archive for September, 2011

It is spring here in Australia- the time of young; the ‘baby-boom’ season of nature. It is usually at this time of year that we Carers become inundated with animals, especially juveniles and babies.

After a quick look at my last couple of blog entries, I see that the last time I posted was in May. It has been fairly quiet (as expected) up until now. Two weeks ago we received a call to come pick up a couple of Pacific Black Ducklings; the mother had walked off with her brood, and these two had somehow been left behind. Two days later we received another, similar call. Except that this time Mother Duck had been frightened by dogs and had walked off with one duckling tagging along, while the remaining seven were left behind. The residents had already caught them when they rang us. As all the ducklings were around the same age, we put the two from before in with the newest seven so they could grow up together. Unfortunately, one duckling died the next morning (I am unsure as to what was wrong). The remaining eight are well 🙂

Last year we were flooded with ducks, so far this year we have had more magpies than ducklings (though I shouldn’t speak too soon). On the 17th we got in a young magpie that was bleeding a little from the tip of the beak, but was otherwise ok. He is now being crèched with other young magpies by someone else. Most birds do better when crèched with others, and fret when are left alone. Five days later we got in another young magpie, which we also passed on to another carer to be crèched; and yesterday we got in two more magpies from a Vet Clinic (one juvenile, one still a chick to be hand-fed).

In the meantime we also received a Murray Magpie chick that had been found in someone’s roof gutter. They had taken it inside, but by the time we were able to come and get it, bring it home and try to warm it up it was already too late. The poor thing had been chilled for too long. If you are reading this and you one day find an injured or orphaned animal, please remember that the first thing that needs to be done is to keep the animal warm. Warmth is the first requirement. If it is obvious the animal needs immediate medical attention, take it straight to a veterinary clinic or animal hospital. If for any reason you find yourself looking after an animal the first thing to do is to warm the bird or animal up to about 32 degrees (Celsius) with a desk lamp, electric heat pad or hot water bottle. Don’t feed them for at least an hour, and leave them in a warm, dark quiet place to recover from shock.

Before you even think about feeding an animal, make sure you know what you have so you can give them the proper diet and the best chance at survival.

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